RICK/A Sea Kayaking Forum

General => General Discussion => Topic started by: FredF on April 30, 2018, 08:56:49 AM

Title: Paddling with a Greenland stick
Post by: FredF on April 30, 2018, 08:56:49 AM
For those of you who have contemplated paddling with a Greenland stick, I recommend the following for some good pointers:

1.) See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QlbuVGtx3F4

2.) For some great advice about how to perform the forward stroke with a Greenland paddle as opposed to a Euro paddle, see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lv6cDQXuHLk

3.) Finally, putting it all together: see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wU9ru9Hroo

4.) And here's one from Paulo Ouillette of Comfort Paddling: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHNLR--TzwY

All three videos stress the importance of the blade angle, something I plan to practice as much as possible this summer. You're never too old to learn something new as long as you're upright and breathing!
Title: Re: Paddling with a Greenland stick
Post by: Emile on July 09, 2018, 07:46:35 AM
I've definitely been contemplating learning to use a Greenland paddle as it looks very interesting. Gearlab makes nice looking carbon fiber ones that come apart for ease of transport. For a euro blade I use a 210cm length. Not sure what length I'd have to go for a greenland paddle. Also, what is another name for one? Often on this forum, that's one of the challenge questions but it didn't like my answer of storm paddle.
Title: Re: Paddling with a Greenland stick
Post by: FredF on July 09, 2018, 08:14:24 AM
In your case, I'd stick with a 210 cm Greenland paddle. My one-piece Superior paddle is 220 cm and I felt it was sometimes too long. Both of my Gearlab paddles are 210 and I feel as if I have better control with them. As for the so-called storm paddle, I'd pass on that and use a two-piece full-length paddle as your spare. If you're paddling low-angle with a Greenland stick, you should be okay when there's wind.
Title: Re: Paddling with a Greenland stick
Post by: ericj on July 09, 2018, 09:39:29 PM
Greenland paddles are sized such that you can stand one tip on the ground and grip the other tip with your arm fully extended over your head.

The loom should be just wide enough so that your hands, when shoulder width apart, should sit so that two fingers are on the loom and the other two are beginning to climb the paddle blade.

The overall length will likely be close to the length of your Euro paddle, but it may also not be the same. The proper loom length is equally important.

I would start off with a wooden version because part of the benefits from a Greenland paddle are the flex and the buoyancy afforded by the wood. There are a number of people who make nice Greenland paddles. Wolfgang Bink is my manufacturer of choice. He also makes a take apart version.

Do not get a storm paddle for a back-up until you are very comfortable with a regularly sized Greenland paddle. Storm paddles require using a special sliding stroke to be effective.

The other term you will hear that is synonymous with a Greenland paddle is "stick" although this is also sometimes conflated with the more general term of "Traditional Paddle" which also includes the less frequently seen Aleutian paddles and the aforementioned storm paddle.
Title: Re: Paddling with a Greenland stick
Post by: Tim on July 10, 2018, 07:23:35 AM
Some folks also refer to the Greenland paddles as "twigs" because they make nice kindling.
Title: Re: Paddling with a Greenland stick
Post by: FredF on July 10, 2018, 08:55:21 AM
@ Tim: Philistine!  :o
Title: Re: Paddling with a Greenland stick
Post by: josko on August 07, 2018, 06:10:00 PM
Why?
Title: Re: Paddling with a Greenland stick
Post by: FredF on August 07, 2018, 08:10:49 PM
Å¡aljiv.  ;)
Title: Re: Paddling with a Greenland stick
Post by: mkrabach on September 13, 2018, 09:30:48 PM
Sorry so late on joining this thread.  I have carved about 25 Greenland paddles, and re-carved about 14 of them based on what I learned paddling with them.  I think my paddles  are as good as anything on the market.  My idea for a perfect paddle (or paddles for different conditions) has evolved as I carved different foils and tapers.  Some of the ones for sale on the Internet are wood working projects as opposed to carefully designed paddles.  I now target the paddles to weigh about 1 1/2 lbs and are very thin and sharp and have a stiff flex.  Not hard to carve.  Band saw to rough out the shape and a low block plane does the rest.  A little sanding and a few coats of Danish Oil finish it.   Total time is about 6 hrs.  Best wood is about $40 for a 2x4x8 Western Red Cedar, or a little less for Alaskan Yellow Cedar.  Got any questions, call, email or hope to see you folks sometime.  Haven't paddled this year as much as previous  summers.
Title: Re: Paddling with a Greenland stick
Post by: Cat on September 14, 2018, 06:57:01 PM
Good to hear from you, Mike - we've missed you!